A discussion of the idea of miracles and the existence of god

When Scottish theologian John Baillie taught at Edinburgh University, he made it a practice to open his course on the doctrine of God with these words: We may be able to talk about others behind their backs, but God is everywhere, yes, even in this classroom. Therefore, in all our discussions we must be aware of His infinite presence, and talk about Him, as it were, before His face. Strong, Lectures in Systematic Theology,

A discussion of the idea of miracles and the existence of god

A discussion of the idea of miracles and the existence of god

Search The Argument from Miracles Miracles have traditionally been taken as validations of religious claims. His resurrection from the dead was the greatest of these miracles, and is still frequently taken today to be a solid reason for believing in the existence of God.

Arguments for The Existence of God - Bible Study

Setting aside the question as to just how strong the evidence for the resurrection, or for any of the other miracles reported in the New Testament, is, religious sceptics frequently cite David Hume as having undermined any such argument for belief in the existence of God.

According to Hume, no matter how strong the evidence for a specific miracle may be, it will always be more rational to reject the miracle than to believe in it.

Hume noted that there are two factors to assess in deciding whether to believe any given piece of testimony: The testimony of a witness that is both honest and a good judge of that to which they testify is worth much. The testimony of a witness who is either dishonest or not in a position to know that to which they testify is worth little.

The reliability of the witness is therefore something that is to be taken into account in deciding whether to believe anything on the basis of testimony.

A discussion of the idea of miracles and the existence of god

The probability of that to which they testify, however, is also relevant. If a witness testifies to sighting a flying pig then it is more likely that their testimony is false than that their testimony is true, even if they are a reliable witness.

The reliability required of a witness in order for his testimony to justify belief in that to which he testifies increases as the probability of that to which he testifies decreases.

According to Hume, however, a miracle is by definition an event that is as unlikely as anything else. Miracles, for Hume, necessarily involve violations of laws of nature.

Laws of nature, though, are as well-established as it is possible for anything to be. It will always, therefore, be more likely that the testimony of a witness to a miracle is false than that it is true.

It will always be more rational to disbelieve a claim that a miracle has occurred than to accept it. What holds for the second-hand testimony of others also holds for first-hand evidence from our own senses. Whatever evidence our senses may give us that a miracle has occurred, it will always be more likely that our senses are in error than that a miracles really has occurred.

Rather, his conclusion is that no evidence is sufficient to establish that a miracle has occurred, that even if a miracle has occurred we ought not to believe in it. One ground on which to criticise it, though, is in its conception of a miracle.

Miracles, it has been argued, need not be violations of laws of nature. An answered prayer, for example, may properly be described as a miracle, but it does not violate any natural law. Miracles are simply events that point us towards God.

Hume on Religion (Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy)

This broader understanding of a miracle raises the possibility that there are at least some miracles that are not so improbable as Hume supposes, and so which can attract rational belief.In the course of a discussion on my personal blog about the existence of God and of the miraculous, an unbelieving reader (who strikes me as open to reasonable discussion) wrote me to say: "All I’m saying is that people everywhere demonstrate a powerful desire to believe that there is interventio.

For those who believe in God, or at least are open to belief in God, a well-attested miracle can be the basis of a persuasive argument that God has acted and revealed himself in a special way. To those who do not believe in God and are resistant to the idea of a miracle-working God, miracle stories are a major type of stumbling block to faith.

Argument from Miracles. The occurrence of miracles is frequently purported to be evidence of the supernatural, and therefore of the existence of a God. Overall () argues for the more radical contention that a miracle would count as evidence against the existence of God, on three grounds: (1) if order and harmony are evidence for the existence of God, then a miracle, which entails a breach in the order and harmony of the universe, must count against the existence of God; (2) the inevitable.

The Argument from Miracles Miracles have traditionally been taken as validations of religious claims. If the Bible is to be believed, then Jesus’ ministry was accompanied by miraculous signs and wonders that testified that it was God working through him. Yes, people have used the methods of science to study the natural workings of the reproductive system and have rightly said that virgins do not get pregnant naturally.

Www.philosophyofreligion.info

But of course, no Christian ever claimed they did! God, miracles, ID or YEC had any evidence to support them. The fact you reject these ideas does not constitute their.

In Defense of Miracles - Christian Research Institute