The abbasid empire

The Abbasids claimed to be the true successors of Prophet Muhammad in replacing the Umayyad descendants of Banu Umayya by virtue of their closer bloodline to Muhammad. The Abbasids also distinguished themselves from the Umayyads by attacking their moral character and administration in general. According to Ira Lapidus"The Abbasid revolt was supported largely by Arabs, mainly the aggrieved settlers of Merv with the addition of the Yemeni faction and their Mawali ".

The abbasid empire

Origins[ edit ] The eponymous ancestor of the Samanid dynasty was Saman Khudaa Persian noble who belonged to a dehqan family, which was a class of land-owning magnates. The original home of the Samanids is unclear, for some Arabic and Persian texts claim that the name was derived from a village near Samarkandwhile others assert it was a village near Balkh or Tirmidh.

The latter is more probable since the earliest appearance of the Samanid family appears to be in Khorasan rather than Transoxiana. He thereafter had a wall constructed around the city to protect it from their attacks.

After not so long, disagreement over where The abbasid empire money should be distributed, started a conflict between the brothers. However, Nasr had been the one who had been invested with Transoxiana, and the Abbasid caliphs continued to recognize him as the rightful ruler.

He thereafter forced the Abbasid caliph to recognize him as the ruler of those territories, which they did. During the same period, he put an end to the Bukhar Khudas in Bukhara. Inhe invaded the territories of the Karluk Turkstaking Talas and converting the Nestorian church there into a mosque.

The invasion was successful; Muhammad ibn Zayd was killed and Tabaristan was conquered by the Samanids. Furthermore, because of his campaigns in north, his empire was so safe from enemy incursions that the defences of Bukhara and Samarkand were unused.

However, this later had consequences; at the end of the dynasty, the earlier strong, but now falling apart walls, were greatly missed by the Samanids, who were constantly under attack by the Karakhanids and other enemies.

Although the Samanid army was much larger, Hasan managed to emerge victorious. Ahmad, before he could plan another expedition to Tabaristan, was the following year murdered by some of his slaves in a tent near Bukhara.

You have Successfully Subscribed! The Abbasid Caliphate The Abbasids in Islamic history In Islamic history, Abbasid was the dynastic name generally given to the caliphs of Baghdad, the second of the two great Sunni dynasties of the Muslim empire, that overthrew the Umayyad caliphs. It seized power inwhen it finally defeated the Umayyads in battle, and flourished for two centuries, but slowly went into eclipse with the rise to power of the Turkish army they had created, the Mamluks.
The Abbasids in Islamic history They moved the capital of the empire from Syria to Iraq, where they built a new capital, Baghdad, from which, during the next five centuries, they would influence many of the main events of Islamic history.
The Abbasid Caliphate - ReligionFacts The Abbasid Empire started magnificent, and fell destitute.
ADDITIONAL MEDIA The Abbasid Caliphate The Abbasids in Islamic history In Islamic history, Abbasid was the dynastic name generally given to the caliphs of Baghdad, the second of the two great Sunni dynasties of the Muslim empire, that overthrew the Umayyad caliphs.

Jaihani was not only an experienced administrator, but also a prominent geographer and greatly educated man. Almost right after Nasr II had ascended the throne, several revolts erupted, the most dangerous one being under the uncle of his father, Ishaq ibn Ahmadwho seized Samarkand and began minting coins there, while his son Abu Salih Mansur seized Nishapur and several cities in Khorasan.

Ishaq was eventually defeated and captured, while Abu Salih Mansur died of natural causes in Nasr responded by sending an army under Ahmad ibn Sahl to suppress the rebellion, which the latter managed to accomplish. After a few weeks, however, Ahmad shortly rebelled himself at Nishapur, made incursions into Gorgan, and then fortified himself in Merv to avoid a Samanid counter-attack.

Nevertheless, the Samanid general Hamuya ibn Ali managed to lure Ahmad out of Merv, and defeated him in a battle at Marw al-Rudh ; he was captured and imprisoned in Bukhara, where he remained until his death in Later ina Dailamite military leader, Makan ibn Kakiseized Tabaristan and Gurgan, and even took possession of Nishapur in western Khorasan.

Consolidation and Schisms

He was, however, forced to withdraw back to Tabaristan one year later, due to the threat that Samanids posed. However, in he declared independence, but was defeated the following year at Iskhabad. He went to a banquet designed to organize the plot and had the head of their leader cut off.

He then convinced his father to abdicate, who died of tuberculosis after a few months. Ibrahim, however, was unpopular with the people of Bukhara, and Nuh soon retaliated by retaking the city and blinding Ibrahim and two brothers.

When the news of the re-capture of Bukhara arrived to Abu Ali Chaghani, he once again marched towards Bukhara, but was defeated by an army sent by Nuh and withdrew back to Chaghaniyan. After some time, he left the region and tried to obtain support from other Samanid vassals.

Meanwhile, Nuh had Chaghaniyan ravaged [28] and its capital sacked. Alp Tiginnominal vassal of the Samanids, conquered Ghazna in from the Lawik dynasty. He would later be the founder of an independent dynasty based in Ghazna, following the decline of the Samanid Empire in the s.

Inone the ghulamsAlp Tigincommander of the army in Khorasan, seized Ghazna and established himself there. InNasr b. Ali, a nephew of Harun, returned and took possession of Bukhara, meeting little resistance.

The Samanid domains were split up between the Ghaznavidswho gained Khorasan and Afghanistanand the Karakhanids, who received Transoxiana; the Oxus River thus became the boundary between the two rival empires.

Driving the Karakhanids out of Bukhara, he then moved on to and captured Samarkand.

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They defeated the Karakhanids in several battles, even when Nasr Khan was involved. Some time afterwards, he returned to the Zarafshan valley, where he gained the support of the Oghuz and others. Following this, he sought the hospitality of an Arab tribe near Merv.

His death marked the defeat of the last attempt to restore the Samanid state. Descendants of the Samanid family continued to live in Transoxiana where they were well regarded, but their power was relatively broken.The Abbasid Dynasty: The Golden Age of Islamic Civilization The Abbasid Caliphate, which ruled the Islamic world, oversaw the golden age of Islamic culture.

The dynasty ruled the Islamic Caliphate from to AD, making it For most of its early history, it was the largest empire in the world, and this meant that it had contact with. Decline of the Abbasid Empire. The Abbasid leadership worked to overcome the political challenges of a large empire with limited communication in the last half of the 8th century (– CE).

The abbasid empire

While the Byzantine Empire was fighting Abbasid rule in Syria and Anatolia, the caliphate’s military operations were focused on internal unrest.

Abbasid vs Umayyad Empire After the death of Prophet Muhammad, Islamic world was guided by Caliphs, the last of whom was Ali (Muhammad’s son in law). Ali’s death split the Muslim world into two with Husain forming and leading one group under the premise that .

The Abbasid Empire started magnificent, and fell destitute. In the 9th century, when Harun al-Rashid was the caliph, the Abbasid Empire was at the pinnacle of its beauty and wealth.

Al-Rashid lived an extravagant life, filled with riches, pleasures, and deceitful acts. The Fatimid dynasty broke from the Abbasids in and created separate line of caliphs in Morocco, Algeria, Tunisia, Libya, Egypt, and Palestine until CE.

Abbasid control eventually disintegrated, and the edges of the empire declared local autonomy. The Abbasid leadership worked to overcome the political challenges of a large empire with limited communication in the last half of the 8th century (– CE).

While the Byzantine Empire was fighting Abbasid rule in Syria and Anatolia, the caliphate’s military operations were focused on internal unrest.

What was the reasons for the fall of the Abbasid Caliphate? | Socratic